Integrated Service Center

Year-End Tax Forms

Last updated Thursday, April 26, 2018

2017 Year-End Tax Forms

Your 2017 University of Washington W-2 or 1099-R is now available for you to access in Workday. For anyone who did not opt out of receiving paper tax forms (learn how to opt out for future years), 2017 paper tax forms were mailed to the employee’s designated mailing address as listed in Workday on January 25, 2018.

For information on how to read your W-2, visit: IRS Form W-2 Explanation.
For information on how to read your 1099R, visit: IRS Form 1099-R Explanation.
For W-2 and other calendar-year end FAQs, simply scroll down below the instructions.

To Retrieve Your 2017 University of Washington W-2

  1. From the Pay worklet in Workday, select My Tax Documents.
  2. Select the View/Print button under Employee Copy, and then select Notify Me Later on the “Your request is being processed” window. (Please note: you may need to “allow pop-ups from Workday” if your web browser blocks pop-ups).
  3. Your 2017 W-2 will then be delivered to your Notifications (select the “bell” icon at the top right of the page).

To Retrieve Your Accessible W-2

An accessible version of your W-2 is available in Workday; to retrieve it, you must first configure your Workday preferences to display accessible forms.

Follow these steps to both update your Workday preferences and retrieve your accessible W-2:

  1. Select the “cloud” icon in the upper right corner of Workday, then select My Account.
  2. Select Change Preferences.
  3. In the screen that opens, under the Account Preferences header, select the Simplified View checkbox.
  4. Select OK.
  5. Select the “W” icon in the upper left corner of the screen to return to the Workday homepage.
  6. Select the Pay worklet.
  7. Under the View heading, select My Tax Documents.
  8. Select the Accessible Form button to open your accessible W-2.

W-2 Retrieval Instructions for International Workers

If your work location is outside of the United States, your Workday screen looks slightly different. To retrieve your tax documents in Workday:

  1. From the Cloud icon on the top of the screen, select View Profile.
  2. Select the Pay tab on the left of the screen, then select the Tax Documents tab on the top of the screen.
  3. Select the View/Print button under Employee Copy, and then select Notify Me Later on the “Your request is being processed” window. (Please note: you may need to “allow pop-ups from Workday” if your web browser blocks pop-ups).
  4. Your 2017 W-2 will then be delivered to your Notifications (select the “bell” icon at the top right of the page).

W-2 Retrieval Instructions for Former Employees

If you no longer work at the University, you can still retrieve your W-2s in Workday, though your Workday screen looks slightly different. To retrieve your tax documents in Workday:

  1. From the Payroll worklet in Workday, select My Tax Documents
  2. Select the View/Print button under Employee Copy, and then select Notify Me Later on the “Your request is being processed” window. (Please note: you may need to “allow pop-ups from Workday” if your web browser blocks pop-ups).
  3. Your 2017 W-2 will then be delivered to your Notifications (select the “bell” icon at the top right of the page).

Please Note: In order to sign into Workday, you will need both your UW NetID credentials and Duo, UW’s two-factor authentication (2FA) solution.

  • If you forgot your UW NetID and/or password, you can email help@uw.edu. Learn more at UW-IT’s About UW NetIDs page.
  • To enroll in Duo, visit IT Connect’s Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) page. Former employees are eligible to enroll in Duo through the remainder of the year in which they left the University, and for the three years following their year of departure.

To Retrieve Your 2017 University of Washington 1099-R

  1. From the Pay worklet in Workday, select the Other Tax Documents (1099R & Stipend Letter) button found under “External Links.”
  2. Once in Legacy ESS, use the Tax Forms link on the left side of the screen, then select Print Tax Forms.

To Retrieve Your 2017 University of Washington Stipend Letter

  1. From the Pay worklet in Workday, select the Other Tax Documents (1099R & Stipend Letter) button found under “External Links.”
  2. Once in Legacy ESS, use the Tax Forms link on the left side of the screen, then select Print Tax Forms.

To Retrieve Your 2017 University of Washington 1042-S

Instructions for individuals with UW Glacier Tax Compliance accounts:

  1. Log into the Glacier Nonresident Alien Tax Compliance System
  2. From the Menu, select I would like to view/print my Form 1042-S

Instructions for individuals without UW Glacier Tax Compliance accounts:

  1. Download and complete the Request for Paper Tax Form Replacement
  2. Fax the completed form (don’t ever email any form that contains your Social Security number) to the ISC at 206-543-8137; or, alternatively, drop off the form in person at the ISC. Note that the request for paper Form W-2s can take up to 48 hours to process.

Glacier Tax Prep Resources for International Students

The University of Washington cannot give any tax advice about filing personal tax returns with the Internal Revenue Service.

These resources can help International Students with filing personal tax returns:


W-2 Frequently Asked Questions

My W-2 hasn’t arrived yet; what should I do?
The ISC mails paper tax forms on January 25 each year. Mail may take several business days to arrive. If you feel enough time has passed for delivery and you still haven’t seen your tax forms, first verify your designated mailing address in Workday. If your address was incorrect or if your tax forms were lost in the mail, you will need to access your tax documents online in Workday following the steps above.

I would also like a copy of a prior year tax form; how do I find those?
Tax documents prior to 2017 can be found using Legacy ESS. For details and step-by-step guidance, or to learn how to request paper tax form replacements, see Obtaining Prior-Year Tax Forms.

I have worked multiple positions this year across the campus. Where do I find my other University of Washington W-2(s)?
Your one University of Washington W-2 reflects your wages and taxes paid for ALL of your positions at the University of Washington, UW Medical Centers and Harborview.

I earn a “Stipend” for my position – is it on my W-2?
At the University of Washington, a Stipend is an Earning Type used to pay a scholarship or fellowship. There are two Stipend Earning Types used by the University: STP and SWB. Stipends are not considered wages, so are not reported on the W-2. However, that does not mean that the Stipend isn’t taxable. Student Fiscal Services (SFS) assess UW Stipend Earnings. For students, any stipend earnings are reported on Form 1098-T. Non-students will receive a Stipend Letter, which were mailed the last week of January 2018.

What should I do if my Social Security Number or Name is wrong on my W-2?
If your name and/or SSN in Workday does not match up with the information on your Social Security card, you will need to submit a copy of your Social Security Card to the ISC’s Payroll department, either in person at the ISC (UW Tower, Floor O-2) or via secured fax line at 206-543-8137 (important security note: please do not ever include your Social Security Number in an email). Once the information is validated, the ISC will make any necessary corrections.

Why is Box 1 different than Box 3 and Box 5?
Box 1 is your reportable taxable income for the calendar year, and is the amount you will enter on the wage line of your tax return per IRS rules; it includes your gross wages minus any pre-tax items such as medical and health premiums, FSA/DCAP contributions and retirement amounts. Box 3 is the amount of your total reportable wages subject to Social Security taxes; retirement plans are not considered pre-tax items for the purposes of Social Security, so Box 3 may be larger than Box 1. Box 5 is the amount of your total reportable wages subject to Medicare taxes; as there is no cap for Medicare taxes the way there is for Social Security taxes, Box 5 may be larger than Box 1 and Box 3.

I made more than what shows in Box 1; why is there a difference?
Box 1 is not usually the same as your gross wages; it is simply the amount of your taxable wages, as determined by the IRS. Box 1 will not include amounts such as your pre-tax benefits, elective deferrals, mandatory retirement contributions or any other amount not subject to taxes.

Why is Box 2 empty?
Box 2 is the amount of Federal Withholding Tax you chose to withhold from your paychecks when you completed your W-4 during the onboarding process. Each employee determines their own amount of withholding. If Box 2 is empty on your W-2, it means either you claimed exempt on your withholding or your calculated withholding elections exceeded your salary, so no amount was withheld from your paychecks. You can update your withholding elections at any time; for guidance, see the Federal Withholding Elections Quick Guide.

Why are Boxes 3 and 5 empty or smaller than expected?
Many student employees are exempt from paying Social Security and Medicare taxes and their earnings aren’t subject to tax. Box 3 and Box 5 will be empty or reduced if you qualified under these student FICA exemption rules. You can find more information about student exemptions on the Tax Office’s FICA page, as well as on the ISC’s OASDI (Social Security & Medicare) page.

Why is Box 3 different than Box 5?
Box 3 is the amount of your total reportable wages subject to Social Security taxes. Box 5 is the amount of your total reportable wages subject to Medicare taxes. As there is no cap for Medicare taxes the way there is for Social Security taxes, Box 5 may be larger than Box 3.

Why is Box 9 empty? Is there supposed to be a verification code?
You may have heard about “verification codes” being used in Box 9 on the employee’s W-2 on the news. Though 16-character long verification codes are being used by some employers to help the IRS verify whether the W-2 information is accurate, W-2 verification codes are currently only a pilot program being used by certain payroll service providers (PSPs). The University of Washington is assessing whether to participate in this program at a future date. A verification code is not necessary for you to complete your tax return.

What is Code DD in Box 12? Do I need to report DD?
The IRS requires employers to include the cost of employer-sponsored health coverage on the employee’s W-2. This amount is reported with Code DD. This amount is not taxable.

Why is my UWRP not in Box 12?
Box 12 includes the amount of elective deferrals and various other types of compensation. The IRS has not designated an official code for mandatory contributions to retirement plans, and therefore the amount would not be displayed in Box 12. Additionally, because contributions to UWRP are considered mandatory contributions and not elective deferrals, UWRP contributions have been taken into account in Box 1 and are not itemized in Box 12. Your year-to-date totals can be found on your payslip.

Other Year-End FAQs

How do I know which tax form I should receive?
The ISC is responsible for sending out three different IRS tax forms. Form W-2s are sent to UW employees who received some form of wage or compensation in the prior calendar year. Form 1042-Ss are sent to UW employees who are foreign nationals who have claimed a tax treaty or code exception to taxation. Form 1099Rs are sent to UW retirees who receive RET payments directly from the University of Washington (not Washington State Department of Retirement Systems).

Where can I find my 1098-T?
1098-Ts are distributed through Student Fiscal Services (SFS). You can download your 1098-T tax form from the link on their webpage: Student Fiscal Services.

What is the difference between a W-2 and a W-4?
The Form W-2 is the tax form sent by the employer to both the IRS and the employee reporting an employee’s earned wages and other salary information, as well as the amount of taxes the employee had withheld from each paycheck in the prior calendar year. Employees use the information found on the Form W-2 when filing their tax return.

Employees use the W-4 to indicate how much federal withholding tax the employer should deduct from each paycheck; the Form W-4 is filled out by employees, usually during the onboarding process. Employees determine their own amount of withholding.

Can I change my withholding elections?
Yes, you can update your withholding elections in Workday at any time. For step-by-step guidance, see the Federal Withholding Elections Quick Guide. Any changes you make will go into effect immediately, though depending on where the University is in the payroll cycle, you may not see the change on your paycheck until the second pay period after you made changes. For more information about withholding calculations for 2018, visit the IRS website: IRS Withholding Tables Frequently Asked Questions.

Why did my net take-home change on my first paycheck in January?
Typically any new deduction changes (eg, increased benefit premium amounts, changes in FSA and/or DCAP contributions, etc) will be reflected in the first paycheck of a new tax year. Additionally, if an employee had met the Social Security max limitation in the prior tax year, and therefore Social Security tax payments had stopped upon meeting that limit, the employee may notice their Social Security deductions starting up again in January. Changes to IRS tax tables may also result in changes to an employee’s federal withholding, which would be seen in the first paycheck of a new tax year.

TurboTax says I overpaid OASDI (Social Security and Medicare) taxes; what should I do?
You will want to verify you entered the correct amounts from your W-2s into the correct fields in TurboTax. People often incorrectly enter the amount from Box 1 on the W-2 into their Social Security Gross and/or Medicare Gross fields in TurboTax or other tax-help software; make sure you entered the amount from Box 3 for Social Security and the amount from Box 5 for Medicare. The Social Security and Medicare amounts on your W-2 are auto-calculated using federally mandated percentages.

I’ve already maxed out my Social Security at another employer; do I still have to pay it at the UW?
Yes. Because the University of Washington has an entirely different Tax ID number, you will have to pay Social Security. Your CPA or other tax advisor may have information about recouping excess Social Security contributions.